IUD’s

Birth Control Without a Monthly Pill

An intrauterine device (IUD) is a little, t-shaped piece of plastic inserted into the uterus to provide birth control. The 3 types of IUDs that use the hormone progestin include Mirena, Skyla, and Liletta. Skyla is the smallest of the progestin IUDs.


Why should you consider Mirena®?

See more children in your future but aren’t ready yet? Or maybe your family is just the right size but you’re not ready for permanent birth control. Either way, Mirena might be right for you if you want birth control that is:

  • Highly effective— One of the most effective birth control methods—over 99% at preventing pregnancy
  • Low-maintenance— No daily pills and no monthly refills. It lasts as long as you want, for up to 5 years. The timeframe is up to you. You should do a monthly thread check to make sure it’s in place. Ask your healthcare provider to explain how. You should schedule a follow-up visit 4 to 6 weeks after your Mirena is placed to check that it’s in the right position
  • Reversible— You can have it removed by your healthcare provider at any time, and try to become pregnant right away.
  • Estrogen-free— It delivers small amounts of progestin locally into your uterus
  • Approved to treat heavy periods— Mirena is the first and only IUD (intrauterine device) birth control that is FDA-approved to treat heavy periods in women who choose intrauterine birth control
    Mirena does not protect against HIV or STDs (sexually transmitted diseases).

If you have any questions about Mirena, have a conversation with your healthcare provider, who can help you decide which birth control option is best for you.

Important Safety Information

  • If you have a pelvic infection, get infections easily, or have certain cancers, don’t use Mirena. Less than 1% of users get a serious pelvic infection called pelvic inflammatory disease (PID).
  • If you have persistent pelvic or stomach pain or if Mirena comes out, tell your healthcare provider (HCP). If Mirena comes out, use back-up birth control. Mirena may attach to or go through the uterus and cause other problems.
  • Pregnancy while using Mirena is uncommon but can be life threatening and may result in loss of pregnancy or fertility.
  • Ovarian cysts may occur but usually disappear.
  • Bleeding and spotting may increase in the first 3 to 6 months and remain irregular. Periods over time usually become shorter, lighter, or may stop.